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Sheb Muhammad ’98, M.Ed. ’09 has made a mark at Carthage far beyond his years as a student.

Sheb Muhammad ?98, M.Ed. ?09 After graduating from high school in Chicago, Mr. Muhammad made his way to Carthage to obtain a bachelor’s degree in graphic design and studio art. If you ask him about his most memorable moments as an undergraduate, one of many highlights was his involvement in the Black Student Union (BSU).

Although his network reached beyond the group, it was important for him to find an affinity with those of a similar background. The friendships formed in the BSU, along with support from the student life staff, provided the sense of belonging that allowed him to find his place and complete his degree at Carthage.

Looking back, he sees Carthage as a microcosm of America. Students can stretch outside of their comfort zone academically, spiritually, and socially.

“If you can’t make it here,” he says, “good luck in the real world.”

With his infectious positivity, Mr. Muhammad certainly made it. He later returned to Carthage to earn a Master of Education with a concentration in administration.

He cares deeply about increasing access to a Carthage education. To pay it forward, he made a commitment to the Wiggan-Kenniebrew Funds. Named in honor of the College’s first Black female and male graduates, Lorraine A. Wiggan ’46 and Alonzo H. Kenniebrew ’54, the funds support students of color.

That aligns with Mr Muhammad’s approach to teaching, volunteerism, and leadership. He is co-chair of the Mary Lou and Arthur F. Mahone Fund scholarship committee, which awards full and partial scholarships to Kenosha-area students enrolling at Carthage and other institutions. As executive director of 21st Century Preparatory School in Racine, he partners with local colleges and universities to enrich middle school learning experiences.

Lastly, as a member of the Alumni Council, Wiggan-Kenniebrew Black Alumni Network, and Alford Park Loyalty Society (which recognizes donors for loyal giving), Mr. Muhammad emboldens others to leave their mark at Carthage beyond graduation.

“It’s not about ‘Look what I’ve done,’” he says. “It’s about helping others, no matter their circumstances. Let us help those who come behind us so they don’t have to struggle.”